Legalizing medical marijuana shows no effect on crime rates in US states

Legalizing medical marijuana shows no effect on crime rates in US states

Contrary to what prohibitionists claim, marijuana reform does not lead to an increase in crime.

Not only is there no correlation between medical marijuana laws and violent crime, crime rates in California actually decreased by 20 percent after legalization.

A still from the cult classic Reefer Madness.

The devastating costs of criminalizing cannabis

How Harry Anslinger's Reefer Madness continues to influence our harmful drug policies.

How one doctor’s personal journey with cannabis helped her overcome the fear of stigma

How one doctor’s personal journey with cannabis helped her overcome the fear of stigma

Dr. Junella Chin has integrated medical marijuana into her family practice after the drug helped her finally find pain relief.

For Today I Am a Boy: Artists capture the feelings of gender dysphoria

For Today I Am a Boy: Artists capture the feelings of gender dysphoria

Artists across the LGBTQ spectrum have highlighted the darkest and brightest depths of gender dysphoria.

The link between drugs and music, explained by science

The link between drugs and music, explained by science

As every toker knows, listening to music while high can make it sound better.

Why ‘recreational’ drug use isn’t a bad thing

Why ‘recreational’ drug use isn’t a bad thing

Our culture views getting high as a moral wrong. Here's why it could actually be good for society.

Latest

  • Amid CBD crackdown, senators urge federal regulators to hurry up on hemp legalization

    NYC will start fining businesses for selling certain CBD products, doctors discredit Berenson's claims, and more in today's newsletter.

    Amid CBD crackdown, senators urge federal regulators to hurry up on hemp legalization
    February 18, 2019

    Congress is talking about marijuana reform, but could it actually happen? As local officials crack down on CBD, senators urge the USDA to hurry up with hemp regulations. Doctors and researchers discredit Alex Berenson in an open letter. Also: A Colorado school fired a substitute teacher for talking about cannabis science on YouTube (while receiving funding from marijuana tax revenue).

  • Bill Barr sworn in as attorney general

    Marijuana advocates cautiously optimistic about Barr, drug convictions tossed due to officer misconduct, and more in today's newsletter.

    The Department of Justice (DOJ) logo is pictured on a wall after a news conference to discuss alleged fraud by Russian Diplomats in New York December 5, 2013.     REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW) - RTX1657T
    February 15, 2019

    William Barr was sworn in as attorney general. Marijuana company board member Bill Weld considers challenging Trump for the GOP presidential nomination. More than a dozen people in Chicago got their drug convictions tossed due to police misconduct. Also: Teens in states with legal medical marijuana are less likely to smoke weed.

  • Judge rules against Walmart for firing MMJ patient

    A federal judge ruled in favor of an employee who failed a drug test, the US House held its first hearing on cannabis, and more in today's newsletter.

    Judge rules against Walmart for firing MMJ patient
    February 14, 2019

    A House hearing on cannabis banking delves into issues of legalization. A federal judge ruled in favor of a Walmart employee who got fired for using medical marijuana. New York lawmakers raise concerns about Cuomo's plan to legalize marijuana. Also: A review found an association between teen cannabis use and adulthood depression.

  • Colorado has sold more than $6 billion in cannabis

    The state reaches another marijuana milestone, Congress takes its first crack at cannabis reform, and more in today's newsletter.

    Colorado has sold more than $6 billion in cannabis
    February 13, 2019

    The new Congress takes its first crack at cannabis reform. Colorado cannabis sales surpassed $6 billion. Researchers found promising evidence that marijuana compounds could stop the growth of colon cancer cells. Also: Besieged by controversy, the CEO of MedMen claims that it is "probably one of the most diverse companies in the world."

  • Kamala Harris refused to support legalization for most of her career

    The presidential hopeful is late to the issue, Big Alcohol is hoping to influence cannabis legislation, and more in today's newsletter.

    Kamala Harris refused to support legalization for most of her career
    February 12, 2019

    Kamala Harris smoked pot in college but still refused to support legalization for most of her career. Big Alcohol is mounting a lobbying blitz on cannabis. A lawsuit alleges that MedMen execs routinely made racist and sexist comments. Also: A jury found El Chapo guilty on all counts.